Premium Stormwater Retention Credits Available Now

Premium Stormwater Retention Credits Available Now

The Anacostia Waterfront Trust is offering for immediate sale 27,092 Premium Stormwater Retention Credits.  These stormwater retention credits were certified by the DC Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) on May 10, 2017. They can be used immediately to meet regulatory obligations, or can be banked indefinitely for future use. 

72 Years on the Anacostia

72 Years on the Anacostia

I spent most of Saturday afternoon sitting at a picnic table, eating good food, chatting with friends and strangers, and watching the Anacostia River flow by. It was an almost perfect way to spend a hot August Saturday.I was at the District’s Seafarers’ Yacht Club, at an event called “Celebrating the History of Seafarers Yacht Club” organized by the Double Nickels Theater and the 11th Street Bridge Park.

Anacostia Park and Community Collaborative (APACC) Policy memo: Proposed Amendments to the District Elements of the Comprehensive Plan

Anacostia Park and Community Collaborative (APACC) Policy memo: Proposed Amendments to the District Elements of the Comprehensive Plan

The Anacostia Waterfront Trust is a member of the Anacostia Park and Community Collaborative, a coalition of nonprofit organizations interested in working collectively to catalyze and assist the transformation of the Anacostia River Corridor. APACC submitted a joint response to the DC Office of Planning’s call for amendments to the Comprehensive Plan in the spring of 2017.

Connecting for a Cleaner Anacostia River - June 21 Stakeholder Meeting Summary

Connecting for a Cleaner Anacostia River - June 21 Stakeholder Meeting Summary

Over 80 people gathered in the basement of Thurgood Marshall Academy in Anacostia last month for an event titled “Connecting for a Cleaner Anacostia River.” The presentations updated the audience about the latest progress on the “Anacostia River Sediment Project” (ARSP) - the plan to clean up contamination at the bottom of the Anacostia River. Below is a brief summary of what the Anacostia Waterfront Trust and our friends with the Anacostia Park and Community Collaborative took away from the meeting. You can also download our 4-page PDF summary here.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: The Anacostia River Corridor is the “Essential Arena” for Building a Resilient DC

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: The Anacostia River Corridor is the “Essential Arena” for Building a Resilient DC

The Anacostia River corridor is poised to play a crucial role in the future of the District of Columbia as it ramps up its efforts to become a more resilient city. When I think about climate change, I often think about the alarming images that come from reports like Climate Central’s study based on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency, worst-case-scenario projections show areas along the Anacostia River inundated by rising water levels by 2100. But communities adjacent to the river not only face the specter of potential flooding in the distant future: residents Wards 7 and 8 also face many other challenges in their daily lives today.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Staying up to date on the projects that will clean up the Anacostia River

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Staying up to date on the projects that will clean up the Anacostia River

The Anacostia River may not (yet!) be the most pristine urban waterway in America, but it’s on its way. Several government agencies are creating plans to clean it up, and many milestone projects and decisions are on track to be completed next year. The cleaning up of these areas is important because not only because remediation will heal the natural environment and improve human safety, but also because the planning processes for these areas will pave the way for the redesign and/or redevelopment of these sites. While Poplar Point may someday be developed to combine ecological restoration along the shoreline and mixed-use development near the Anacostia Metro station, areas like Kenilworth Park may someday be designed to combine expanded forest cover with additional recreational space and better access to the waterfront.

Help Shape the Comprehensive Plan - and the future of the Anacostia Waterfront

Help Shape the Comprehensive Plan - and the future of the Anacostia Waterfront

Last month, the DC Office of Planning extended the public amendment period for the District Elements of the Comprehensive Plan. This means that residents have until June 23, 2017 to submit proposed amendments to the existing plan that could make it into an updated document in 2018. If you have any sort of vision for what you think your neighborhood—or the Anacostia River waterfront—should look like over the next 20 years, then you’ll want to make sure your vision is reflected in the document!

Perfect Weather for a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony: Lots of Rain!

Perfect Weather for a Ribbon Cutting Ceremony: Lots of Rain!

The forecast for Thursday morning was gray, rainy and cold – but the Anacostia Waterfront Trust was joined by nearly 40 friends and supporters to celebrate the completion of its first RainPay green infrastructure project.

Representatives from the Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC), the District Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), Anacostia Riverkeeper, Casey Trees, Greening Urban, Environmental Quality Resources, Green Scheme, neighborhood organizations and many more groups huddled together under tents graciously provided by Casey Trees.

The Holy Hill is Going Green this Thursday!

The Holy Hill is Going Green this Thursday!

On Thursday, May 11th, the Anacostia Waterfront Trust will be hosting a ribbon cutting event at the national headquarters of the Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC) in Ward 7. The event will mark the completion of the Trust’s first bioretention (or rain garden) facility, located on what is known as the “Holy Hill”. This garden is part of RainPay, our triple-bottom-line program designed to bring tangible improvements to the Anacostia River and watershed communities while providing financial benefits to the neighborhood. Come out if you can and help us celebrate this momentum!

Executive Director’s Statement on Anacostia Remediation Budget

Executive Director’s Statement on Anacostia Remediation Budget

Chairperson Cheh and members of the Transportation and Environment Committee, thank you for convening this public hearing and giving me the chance to offer you my thoughts on the District’s efforts to characterize and remediate the legacy toxic contamination in and along the shoreline of the Anacostia River. The Anacostia means a great deal to me; I lived and worked in Ward 6 for 30 years, have been paddling the river recreationally since the early1990s, and have been working professionally to clean up and revitalize it in one way or another since 1997. 

Anacostia Waterfront Trust Providing Solutions Through RainPay

Anacostia Waterfront Trust Providing Solutions Through RainPay

The Anacostia Waterfront Trust has partnered with the Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC) at its Nannie Helen Burroughs property in Northeast where a rain garden has been erected to capture water that can be used as credits and sold to developers to apply to their rain pay tax.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Clean Water, More Jobs

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Clean Water, More Jobs

Increasingly, public discourse pits environment protections against jobs and local economic development. Yet communities within the Anacostia watershed demonstrate how environmental regulations and directives create jobs and spur investment in local communities.

A Public Discussion on the Future of the Anacostia Waterfront

A Public Discussion on the Future of the Anacostia Waterfront

On April 4th, the Anacostia Waterfront Trust held a public forum about the future of the Anacostia waterfront in partnership with the Committee of 100 on the Federal City.

Former DC Mayor Anthony Williams, who focused the District government’s attention on the Anacostia river during his 8-year term, provided opening remarks and called for the parkland along the Anacostia river to become Washington’s 21st Century urban waterfront.

Reflections on the Anacostia for World Water Day

Reflections on the Anacostia for World Water Day

World Water Day is an annual United Nations designated holiday, celebrated around the globe every March 22nd. I’m a little embarrassed that it sneaked by me again. It was created at the UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. I was there.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Sparking Collaboration for Anacostia Park

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: Sparking Collaboration for Anacostia Park

Institutions, agencies, non-governmental organizations, and prominent officials often speak about the need to work collaboratively toward shared goals, particularly when it comes to managing watersheds and public lands. A recent meeting with National Park Service (NPS) Superintendent Tara D. Morrison and over 100 stakeholders was a major step forward in actually setting an action-oriented, community-driven agenda for enhancing Anacostia Park and the river that flows through it.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: What Climate Change Means. For People. Now.

Notes from the Anacostia Ambassador: What Climate Change Means. For People. Now.

Every day I hear about climate change. It scares me, particularly when I think about what it means for the lives of my children and their generation.

And that’s a problem if we as a society want to fully embrace climate change mitigation and adaptation now. We should be thinking about what it means now for individuals most vulnerable to extreme heat and flooding events that are already beginning to occur and will only increase with a warming planet. What it means for neighbors who are at the highest risk because they already face health challenges or lack financial resources to use air conditioning more, conduct repairs, or otherwise adapt when disaster strikes. 

Preparing for Climate Change East of the River

Preparing for Climate Change East of the River

As part of the city’s ongoing outreach efforts, DOEE's Kate Johnson recently shared these and other facts with the more than 40 people who participated in the February 3 APACC meeting on climate change. Events like this are important to keep communities East of the River informed about the likely threats posed by climate change as well as include them in plans for what can be done to improve the resiliency of this region.

Below is a video with highlights from the event as well as five questions and answers about climate change that every organization, policymakers, and residents in Ward 7 & 8 should know.

Resiliency and the Anacostia Corridor

Resiliency and the Anacostia Corridor

The Trust has developed a program called “RainPay” that attempts to do just that. It lessens the pollution and erosion effects of street and rooftop runoff by making the ground absorb more, and it gets an income stream into nonprofits in low-income communities. If we can get the program to scale, we are going to employ people, too, to operate and maintain the installations.  It’s all paid for with a small portion of the profits from development under the District’s creative Stormwater Retention Credit regulations.

So we’re cleaning up our dirty urban river and promoting resiliency in two ways at the same time.